A Bus Pass With Every Condo at Lansdowne Proposed

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Josh Pringle, CFRA

Each residential unit at the redeveloped Lansdowne Park could come with a one year transit pass for OC Transpo.

The Transportation Demand Management Plan report by McCormick Rankin recommends the City require the developers to provide all purchasers of residential units with a transit pass to "create and establish a culture" of transit amongst the residents living at Lansdowne.

The report notes the City of Toronto recently introduced a policy requiring all new condo developments with more than 20 units to include a one year TTC Metropass with the purchase of each unit.

The Transportation Demand Management Plan outlines ideas to ensure the Lansdowne Park redevelopment achieves maximum benefits from a wider use of sustainable transportation modes, including public transportation and bicycling.

The City is also encouraged to set up enhanced bicycle parking facilities, create preferential parking for registered carpools and build showers and locker room facilities for employees at a redeveloped Lansdowne Park who bicycle to work.

Public Meeting for Lansdowne Soil

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Josh Pringle, CFRA

A meeting will be held at the end of this month to discuss the environmental issues surrounding the redevelopment of Lansdowne Park.

Friends of Lansdowne says the lot contains large amounts of contaminated soil that will be dug up during the construction on a redeveloped Lansdowne.

The Ministry of Environment, the City and an independent environmental expert will make presentations on the cost and care required for the clean-up.

The meeting will be held October 27th at the Glebe Community Centre.

City's Lansdowne consulting firm earned $2.8M on sole-sourced contract

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By David Reevely, Ottawa Citizen

Only one firm could help the city government navigate its deal with private developers to renovate Lansdowne Park, according to the top city manager, and it doesn't come cheap.

The company: Graham Bird & Associates. The price tag: $2.8 million (and maybe more). Competition for the work: None.

Documents obtained for the Citizen by access-to-information specialist Ken Rubin say Bird's firm is to be paid $1.776 million for its work on the Lansdowne redevelopment plan between July 2010 and the end of December 2013, broken into chunks that match the project's stages. With sales tax of $230,879.99, the bill for the 3½ years of work is $2,006,879,99.

Bird and his team worked on the file before that, though, and e-mails between city purchasing officials trying to decide how to bill for and record the work indicate that there's an "invoice history" up to June 2010 of $792,341, suggesting a grand total of about $2.8 million.

The documents predate the project's conclusion date slipping by two years, but in a written statement city spokesman Michael FitzPatrick said the longer timeline shouldn't mean the city pays more money: "The overall cost of the contract will not increase regardless of the schedule delay," he wrote.

Bird wouldn't speak to the Citizen to discuss just what the city gets for the money, but of course it doesn't just buy the services of Graham Bird himself: he's the head of a consulting firm with seven staff listed on its website, and they all need to be paid.

Lansdowne plans move forward

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City committee approves new finances, timeline

YourOttawaRegion.com

GLEBE - Glebe merchants are threatening to launch an appeal and another man has filed a second court challenge against the Lansdowne redevelopment plan, but that didn't stop city councillors from endorsing a new financial plan and timeline for the project.

The city's finance and economic development committee gave the thumb's up to the updated plan on Aug. 18, after city manager Kent Kirkpatrick said the project is "stronger now than it was" in June of 2010, when city council first approved the redevelopment plan, which is a partnership with the Ottawa Sports and Entertainment Group (OSEG).

But that came after a few barbs leveled at councillors by Paul Webber, a lawyer representing the Glebe Business Improvement Area (BIA).

The city broke its promise to block fashion retail stores from moving into Lansdowne, Webber charged, and Glebe businesses will fight the city if it tries to allow those types of stores on the site.